Lessons Learned Part IV – Networking, Honesty, and Teaming

More CRE Lessons Learned

Posted: March 8, 2017 by Paul Cohen, Regional Director

LESSONS LEARNED IV – BROKER ADVICE ON NETWORKING, HONESTY, AND TEAMING

And the advice keeps on coming.  This post we cover topics from the importance of networking, honesty, and teaming.  I look forward to receiving more advice.  Checkout the past three posts: 

Lessons Learned Part I – Ten Takeaways from 25 years in CRE 

Lessons Learned Part II – Broker Advice From Around the Country

Lessons Learned Part III – More Broker Advice From Around the Country


More CRE Lessons Learned - Carolyn Niemczyk
Carolyn Niemczyk, CFM
Keyes Commercial, Port St Lucie, FL

Be willing to go the extra mile:  The majority of my clients stay with me thru purchase after purchase and lease after lease. I can get the a/c fixed on a Sunday or a locksmith there Friday night to avoid any overtime charges. Maintain good relationships with all service providers.


More CRE Lessons Learned - Alan Bolduc Avison YoungAlan Bolduc CCIM, SIORSenior Vice President
Avison Young, Charleston, SC

Networking 101.  Find a group, association or organization where you will find the people you want to meet and get to know as possible clients or can refer you to potential clients… BUT, you need to be the only one in the room that does what you do!  And go often.  No one knows when you aren’t there, only when you are!


More CRE Lessons Learned - GG Galloway - CBCG.G. Galloway – Associate/Partner
Coldwell Banker Commercial Benchmark, Ormond Beach, FL

  1. Never be afraid to ask a dumb question…… it may save you or your client a lot of money.
  2. Being in the business for 30 years, one would think you have about heard everything there is too hear…. wrong…… stay actively involved in your trade associations as well as continuing your continued education.  Give back to your communities by being actively involved not just in your professional and trade associations but equally involved in community activities and nonprofits. Reach out and become mentors to others, and help and share some of the success, failures, pitfalls, and sidesteps that we ALL have enjoyed throughout ones career.
  3. Teaming is the way to go.  A team will accomplish so much more than an individual that thinks they have to have it all. There is no “I” in TEAM, a team has multiple fronts, hands, ears, and eyes. Best of all a Team can be at multiple locations at the same time as well as completing multiple tasks outside an office as well as multiple tasks within an office.
  4. Don’t bull shit your way out of a question that you don’t have the answer for…. We are professionals….. and when a question arises that you have no real answer for….. let the person know you don’t know; however, I will find out the answer to your question and report back to you with my findings.
  5. Live by the sunset rule….. if it was important enough for someone to call you today….. call that person back by sunset the day of  or at least before you leave your office if it is after sunset…even if you leave a message to an answering machine….. let ALL know your call is very important to and the success of my business……thank you for the consideration.
  6. Email, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, texting……………. how about just an old fashioned hand written thank you note or card……… Thanks for your business or thanks for your time today.
  7. Business cards are not dinosaurs…. pass out two when you give one out…… one to the customer and ask them to give one to a friend or customer of theirs who may need your services.

More CRE Lessons Learned - Aaron LigonAaron Ligon – Managing Principal
LCRE Partners, Charlotte, NC

  • Be clear, and tell the truth.  Brokers often try to solve problems before presenting a difficult situation to a client.  Or in an effort to be helpful, they’ll obsess about how to present a situation or set of circumstances in the most positive way possible. Simply be clear, and tell the truth.  Do it quickly.  State the problem, outline the circumstances, and suggest solutions, or at least some potential action steps to navigate toward a solution. Most problems get worse when you delay discussion.
  • Simple is best.  In a world of deep analytics and tons of data, sometimes simple is best.  Delving into cap rates, levered yields, after-tax IRR’s, and complex waterfall structures can leave your head spinning.  When analyzing a potential acquisition for yourself or a client, don’t forget to also make the simplest possible analysis.  How does the purchase price of the asset compare to other trades on a cost per square foot basis? Is this purchase below or above the cost of reproduction?  Irrespective of a tenant/lease, what is the real rental rate for the property?  Is the underlying land likely to appreciate?  Answering those and other basic questions will often provide clarity around an otherwise complex transaction.
  • Be a value-add for your clients:  Adding value in the real estate service business requires one or more of three basic contributions: 1) Information, 2) Resources, and/or 3) Hard work.  The most successful real estate brokers and investors leverage all three.  If you don’t have financial resources to invest, you should be well-informed and working hard for your clients.  If you’re not offering intelligence, financial resources, or diligent work, you’re not adding value, and you won’t fool them for long.

 

Paul Cohen

Paul Cohen, Regional DirectorPaul Cohen is a Regional Director with CREXi based in the firm’s Miami office and focused on business development in the southeast. Prior to joining CREXi, Cohen was a Managing Director specializing in investment sales and equity raises at Cohen Financial, a national debt and equity advisor. Prior to Cohen Financial, Paul owned and operated his own independent real estate firm following a 12-year tenure at CBRE where Cohen was a Senior Vice President and led the Private Client Group in Miami-Dade County with a specialty in office and industrial investment sales.  Email Paul

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